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Blog posts tagged with 'A FAVORITE SPOT'

Antarctica
Teufelsberg5 As a native of Southern California who generally despises the cold, I still claim Antarctica as one of my favorite spots on the planet. There are so many things I love about this continent—its sheer immensity, its towering icebergs and mountains, its moonlike, otherworldly desolation—but perhaps the most wonderful thing about Antarctica is the silence.
Teufelsberg, Berlin
Teufelsberg5To get from downtown Berlin to Teufelsberg without a car, you take the 17-minute S-Bahn ride from Berlin Central Station to the Heerstrabe stop. Once there, you step onto the train platform and begin a 30-minute trek along a dirt path that meanders through an expanse of grass and up a hill. You might feel like you’re trespassing or heading into an abyss, but I promise, Teufelsberg waits for you. A man-made hill, Teufelsberg, German for “Devil’s Mountain,” sits atop a never completed Nazi military technical college.
La Turbie, France
ALP52Kindly contributed by Jonathan Arlan, author of the new book Mountain Lines, in which he narrates an inspirational trek through the French Alps that he undertook in 2015. Arlan overcomes apprehension, nerves, poor physical condition and days of bad weather as he slowly conquers the Grand Traverse route from Lake Geneva to the Mediterranean. Along the way, the author meets friendly, decent people and experiences both true exhaustion and true exhilaration.
The Dolomites
Kindly contributed by Stephen O’Shea, a prolific and insightful historian, author photowhose previous books include The Friar of Carcassonne. O'Shea is back with the release of The Alps, A Human History from Hannibal to Heidi and Beyond. In his latest book, O’Shea recounts a 500-mile journey through the Alps while musing on personalities such as Napoleon, Hitler, James Bond and more. Read on to learn about his favorite spot in all of the Alps.
A Fragment of Central Europe
EUR508Kindly contributed by Lucy Abel-Smith, author of the new Blue Guide Travels in Transylvania. With maps, plans and photographs, this accessible guide to Transylvania's "land that time forgot" focuses on its small towns. With cultural heritage from Romania, Hungaria, Saxony and Judaea, the lovely Tarnava Valley is home to an extraordinary mix of cultures and landscapes.
. Richis/Reichesdorf is a small village in the centre of Transylvania, now part of Romania but Hungarian until 1918. It thrived under its Saxon population, from its 12th century foundation under the Hungarian kings.
A Holy Mountain in Mongolia
CAS250Kindly contributed by Jack Weatherford, author of several books about Genghis Khan and Mongol culture, including Genghis Kahn and the Making of the Modern World and The Secret History of the Mongol Queens. His latest book, Genghis Khan and the Quest for God  delves into the great leader's tactics off the battlefield, in the world of religion. Here the historian shares a favorite spot to write, live and be in Mongolia.
  I live and write in my favorite spot on planet Earth.
The Places Where Life Begins
ARC360
Kindly contributed by Michael Engelhard, author of the forthcoming Ice Bear, The Cultural History of an Icon. The product of meticulous research, his cultural narrative examines over 8,000 years of polar bear history. Engelhard probes the narratives of the Inuit, hunters and settlers as well as modern science to show the many forms the powerful, elusive animal has taken. In his book American Wild Engelhard documents his travels between the two areas of the world he identifies as his "soul-scapes," canyon country of the American Southwest and Alaska's great wilds.
The Southern Ocean
JeanauthorKindly contributed by Jean McNeil, author of Ice Diaries: an Antarctic Memoir, published by ECW Press. Ice Diaries is the winner of the Adventure Travel category as well as the Grand Prize at the 2016 Banff Mountain Film Festival and Book Competition.
  I have written substantial parts of my last two books at sea, much of them while clinging to the desk with one hand while looking out the cabin window to determine which stage we were in the great oceanic washing machine cycle. If the porthole was submerged, it was bad. If I suddenly found myself horizontal when I thought I had been standing, or vice versa, then it was bad.
Chimney Rock
chimney3Kindly contributed by historian David Welky, whose new book A Wretched and Precarious Situation we are thrilled to recommend to travelers to the Arctic. Delving into newly discovered letters, diary entries and field notes, Welky uncovers how the Crocker Land Expedition (1913 to 1917) survived shipwreck, disease, low supplies and murder while trying to explore (what they thought was) a new continent. Here he shares how his work as a historian colors his experience of each destination he visits.   As a professional historian, I feel the past wherever I go. Walking into a bungalow home sends me into the Roaring Twenties.
Belize Barrier Reef
Kindly contributed by Longitude Assistant Editor Ben Hankey who recently returned from Belize and Guatemala where he discovered this favorite spot.
coast We were a long way from Minnesota now, in the teal waters off the Belize Barrier Reef. Up at the lake where I spend many summer days, the water is usually forest green or slate blue. This shade of water, a lustrous, Caribbean hue, had to be savored. Under sail from Caye Caulker, we had ridden for over an hour above the sun-filled shallows, a bottom of sugar sand, in which the tails of whale sharks slipped beneath the hull. Now we were within sight of Ambergris Caye and about half a mile from the breaker that surged white over the hidden reef. The foam rushed over the head of the coral wall.