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Blog posts tagged with 'BOOK OF THE WEEK'

The Nordic Theory of Everything
nordic theory coverThe American fascination with all things Scandinavian, from hygge to the minimalist architecture and design, has been growing over the past few years and launched a number of articles and books obsessed with what makes Denmark and its northern neighbors among the happiest and highest performing cultures in the world, such as Michael Booth’s The Almost Nearly Perfect People. New York Times and Atlantic Journalist Anu Partanen adds to the conversation with her recent release The Nordic Theory of Everything.
Unseen Cuba
CBA303Because of its unique political history, Cuba’s airspace has been subject to uncommon restrictions. Fueled by a passion for the country’s unique beauty, Lithuanian photographer Marius Jovaisa persevered through years of bureaucratic obstacles to receive permission to photograph the island nation from above. The result of his persistence is Unseen Cuba: over 400 pages of never before photographed vistas, from the misty mountains of the Sierra Cristal range to the sandbars, reefs and turquoise waters of the north coast to Baracoa, Cuba’s oldest city, and beyond.
The Greeks
GRE619A well-illustrated tribute to the foundations of Western civilization, The Greeks, An Illustrated History, published by National Geographic as a companion to the PBS series The Greeks, is the perfect introduction for travelers to Greece and its fabled isles. The photographic history pays special attention to ancient innovations: great literature and architecture, war tactics, democracy, the philosophy of Socrates and more. Historian Diane Harris Cline laces the gripping story of the Greek Empire with discoveries like the Uluburun shipwreck, the earliest writing found in Europe and buried palaces.
Body of Water
CRB355In his new book Body of Water, poet and Montana fly-fishing guide Chris Dombrowski maps the Bahamas—its ecology, human history and relationship to the tourism industry—through the person of David Pinder, a legendary bonefishing guide. Dombrowski is deep in a personal depression when a friend offers him a trip to the Bahamas to fish for the elusive and highly-prized bonefish at a prestigious resort. There Dombrowski meets a mentor and guide in the now-retired Pinder, a Bahamian whose stories of his guiding days and the fish he caught, or guided others to catch, are epic narratives told with an often poetic flare.
My Beer Year
coverIf you’ve been paying attention, you may have noticed that beer, especially craft beer, is in right now. According to the Washington Post, the number of breweries in the United States has increased twofold in just four years. As of December 2015, there are 4,144 breweries in the country. Lucy Burningham, beer aficionada and author of the recently released My Beer Year, has been rejoicing in this beer renaissance. Burningham decided to take passion for beer to the next level by becoming a certified beer expert, studying independently and traveling throughout the United States and abroad to Europe in her efforts to master the craft.
The Travel Book
WLD193Lonely Planet’s The Travel Book was first published in 2004 to much acclaim and has since sold over one million copies, becoming an essential part of any traveler’s library. Just released in its third edition, this encyclopedia of fun facts, essential travel information, excellent recommendations and vivid color photographs is an armchair traveler’s best friend. Each country profiled, no matter how big or small, gets a double-page spread in this big, glossy celebration of travel. All the countries—from Afghanistan to Zimbabwe—are portrayed in a portfolio of color photographs, a map, brief overview and fascinating facts.
A Visit to Don Otavio
MEX126A Visit to Don Otavio, which the esteemed travel writer Bruce Chatwin called “the most perfect travel book of the 20th century,” is back in print in a new edition from New York Review of Books (Chatwin, in fact, delivers the introduction). Originally published in 1953, Sybille Bedford’s account of her travels through Mexico just after World War II is full of astute detail and novelistic flourishes—the author herself described it as “a travel book written by a novelist.” Her vivid scenes, larger-than-life characters and charming descriptions of her adventures with her traveling companion, “E.
The Woman in Cabin 10
woman in cabin ten coverA luxury cruise with a small number of guests takes off in search of the Aurora Borealis by way of the North Sea. All goes well until a woman vanishes, pushed off a balcony into the freezing waters below, with only one witness: travel journalist Lo Blacklock, who scrambles to piece together the clues and uncover the truth. Sound like an Agatha Christie tale? Not quite, but The Woman in Cabin 10, by English novelist Ruth Ware, has earned favorable—and apt—comparisons to the works of the reigning queen of the mystery genre.
Coming Home to Tibet
TBT177“China drew a blanket of complete silence over Tibet,” writes Tsering Wangmo Dhompa of the twenty years following the 1959 Tibetan Uprising against Chinese presence in Tibet. Since that time, the country has gradually opened to travelers, who discover the formerly isolated state transformed by the Chinese intrusion. For those who have yet to access the border, Dhompa acts as an intermediary. The daughter of a prominent Tibetan nomadic family, born in exile and raised in Nepal and India and now residing in San Francisco, she effortlessly ushers readers across borders and between worlds. Dhompa’s circumstances also leave her at a loss, searching for home and identity in her mother’s country.
The Return
hishammatar windowWriter Hisham Matar gained international recognition with his debut novel, In the Country of Men, which uses the perspective of a nine-year-old boy to show life in Libya following the 1969 revolution. Under dictator Muammar Gaddafi, Libya entered an oppressive, terrifying regime, which banished and murdered critics and committed brutal war crimes, leaving the country in a quiet state of terror. Matar has first-hand knowledge of these troubled times as a native Libyan who spent the first six years of his life in Tripoli. During these years, his father Jaballa bravely carried on illegal activities as a political dissident against the Gaddafi regime.