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Blog posts tagged with 'antarctica'

An Interview with Midge Raymond

authorIn her book My Last Continent, novelist Midge Raymond shares a love story about penguin researchers who find themselves at the heart of a maritime disaster in the Southern Ocean. We've asked her questions about her novel, her research, and her interest in penguins.

1) What inspired you to write about Antarctica? Did you visit the continent before or during writing this novel?

I visited the Antarctic peninsula in 2004, on a small ship much like the Cormorant. Right after returning, I wrote a short story, “The Ecstatic Cry,” which was inspired by a moment in which I saw a passenger fall on the ice near a penguin colony. He was fine, fortunately, but seeing this reinforced the notion that, at the bottom of the world, you are at the mercy of the conditions and of the few people who are with you...

Antarctica
Teufelsberg5 As a native of Southern California who generally despises the cold, I still claim Antarctica as one of my favorite spots on the planet. There are so many things I love about this continent—its sheer immensity, its towering icebergs and mountains, its moonlike, otherworldly desolation—but perhaps the most wonderful thing about Antarctica is the silence.
An interview with Matt Sewell
singleWith pop-art watercolors and whimsical descriptions, Matt Sewell express the individual characters of 50 seabirds in his new book Penguins and Other Seabirds. His illustrations are so inviting, we had to learn more.
  Longitude. Are penguins fish or birds? …Just kidding. The idea for your book came this autocorrect question on Google. What, besides educating the general public, were your goals in producing this book? Sewell. Penguins are ace but it was also a really good chance for me to focus on seabirds in general there are so many around the world it was great way to get them in my canon.
The Southern Ocean
JeanauthorKindly contributed by Jean McNeil, author of Ice Diaries: an Antarctic Memoir, published by ECW Press. Ice Diaries is the winner of the Adventure Travel category as well as the Grand Prize at the 2016 Banff Mountain Film Festival and Book Competition.
  I have written substantial parts of my last two books at sea, much of them while clinging to the desk with one hand while looking out the cabin window to determine which stage we were in the great oceanic washing machine cycle. If the porthole was submerged, it was bad. If I suddenly found myself horizontal when I thought I had been standing, or vice versa, then it was bad.
Interview with Carol Devine & Wendy Trusler
Of interest to armchair travelers, environmentalists, adventurers and foodies alike, The Antarctic Book of Cooking and Cleaning is an absorbing chronicle of a 55-person environmental cleanup expedition in Bellingshausen, Antarctica. The two authors, Carol Devine, who organized the trip, and expedition chef Wendy Trusler, share the rich experiences and creative thought that went into their captivating travelogue.
Longitude. What first inspired you to take a group of volunteers to clean up a portion of the Antarctic? Did you find the prospect intimidating at the time?
The Antarctic Book of Cooking & Cleaning
What do you think about when you think about Antarctica? Penguins? Icebergs? Shackleton? If food was not the first thing to come to mind, writes Carol Devine, it should be the second. In 1996 Devine led several volunteer groups to Bellingshausen, a Russian research station in Antarctica, to conduct an environmental clean-up project in conjunction with the Russian Antarctic Expedition. One of the first people Devine hired was the chef Wendy Trusler. In collaboration once again, Devine and Trusler have produced a beautiful compendium detailing their experiences cooking and cleaning in polar realms.
Antarctic Peninsula
Kindly contributed by Felicity Aston, the first woman to ski solo across Antarctica. Her inspirational saga, captured in her new memoir Alone in Antarctica, takes us deep into the polar climate where the daring explorer meditates on human vulnerability, struggle and the kind of aloneness we rarely feel in today's Information Age.
  My first proper job at the age of 23 was as a meteorologist on a British scientific research station on the Antarctic Peninsula. Responsible for monitoring climate and Ozone, one of my regular tasks was to measure the accumulation of snow using an array of stakes that had been established a short distance from the base.
Best of 2014
Planning your travels for the new year? Dream of new destinations with the best travel books of 2014. Here are, in our humble opinion, the Year's Best Reads for the traveler -- carefully culled and reviewed for your reading pleasure -- including cultural portraits, memoir, photography and, of course, travelogues. The Broken Road.
Melting Away
A widely published and celebrated photographer, Camille Seaman has built a career on majestic portraiture. Over a 10-year period, she traveled to the poles as an expedition photographer to document the rapidly changing face of the Arctic and Antarctic regions. In her new book Melting Away, Seaman offers a masterful series of 75 photos of beauty and historical significance, presented alongside accompanying essays, which evocatively reveal climate change at work.
Cape Bird, Antarctica

Kindly contributed by the celebrated photographer Camille Seaman, who has built her career on majestic portraiture. Over a 10-year period, Seaman traveled to the poles to document the rapidly changing face of the polar regions. Her new collection Melting Away, a masterful series of 75 photos presented alongside accompanying essays, shows climate change at work.