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Blog posts tagged with 'china'

China's New Year
CHN831As we ring in the Chinese New Year, we’re highlighting a few new publications on that country in this year of the rooster. China's Economy, What Everyone Needs to Know. Kroeber thoroughly examines the recent history of the Chinese economy, presenting an even-handed approach to the future of China as it continues to grow. He explores the nuance of Chinese politico-bureaucracy as it relates to the economy. Free of economic jargon and technical details; aimed at a broad audience of those interested in knowing more about China's economy. China, The Cookbook.
Gifts for Travelers
MAP59The holiday season has arrived! We’re here to lighten your load with book recommendations for that person in your life who is always off somewhere new! These gorgeous illustrated gift books would make a treasured addition to any traveler’s library. Happy holidays and safe travels this season! The Travel Book. Each country, no matter how big or small, gets a double-page spread in this big, glossy celebration of travel. All the countries from Afghanistan to Zimbabwe get a portfolio of color photographs, a map, brief overview and fun facts. Irresistible!
Coming Home to Tibet
TBT177“China drew a blanket of complete silence over Tibet,” writes Tsering Wangmo Dhompa of the twenty years following the 1959 Tibetan Uprising against Chinese presence in Tibet. Since that time, the country has gradually opened to travelers, who discover the formerly isolated state transformed by the Chinese intrusion. For those who have yet to access the border, Dhompa acts as an intermediary. The daughter of a prominent Tibetan nomadic family, born in exile and raised in Nepal and India and now residing in San Francisco, she effortlessly ushers readers across borders and between worlds. Dhompa’s circumstances also leave her at a loss, searching for home and identity in her mother’s country.
South of the Clouds
Book coverIn 1992, Bill Porter, a translator and interpreter of Chinese texts, produced a series of digestible, observant radio programs for a Hong Kong station about his travels through Yunnan in southwest China. Now, 14 years later, he has collected these pieces and reworked them for his latest travel narrative, South of the Clouds. Without a set itinerary, Porter has the luxury of developing spontaneous plans based on recommendations and is not shy about talking to the locals. Getting as close as he can via boat, train, or bus, Porter visits many isolated villages, tucked away in the mountains.
The Silk Roads
Finding Western history rigidly focused on the Mediterranean and the Atlantic, in his new book The Silk Roads: A New History of the World Oxford historian Peter Frankopan reorients readers towards Asia. The result is a tour-de-force that is well over 600 pages and spans from Israel to China, from the Agricultural Revolution to the second term of President Obama. Far from being mere trade routes, the Silk Roads were an essential first step to today's complex and interconnected world.
Best Travel Books of 2015
Looking for some book recommendations for 2016? As you begin planning you travels for the New Year, don't miss the top ten travel books of 2015. Where the Dead Pause, and the Japanese Say Goodbye. When her American father passes away, Marie Mutsuki Mockett seeks consolation in her mother's home country of Japan. Her relatives own a Buddhist temple near the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, and after the 2011 tsunami, radiation levels prohibit the burial of her grandfather.
Summer Reads
We spent the last week in May at Book Expo America in New York City, scouring publisher booths for the best travel titles coming out this fall. But let's not get too far ahead of ourselves, with a summer of beach reading spreading before us. To tide you over, stock up on some of the popular paperbacks we've hand-selected for your summer reading pleasure. Midnight in Europe. On the eve of World War II, Cristian Ferrar, a Spanish expat, decides to help supply weapons to the beleaguered army fighting Franco in Spain.
An Interview with Charlie Carroll
Inspired by a long-time obsession with Tibet, high school English teacher Charlie Carroll, took a sabbatical to explore the country of his dreams, contending with Chinese bureaucracy, struggling across harsh terrain and encountering breathtaking altitudes. At a teahouse on the border of China and Tibet, he met Lobsang, a Tibetan exile who crossed the Himalayas years before. Carroll discusses his decision to tell the story of both of their journeys in the volatile region in Peaks on the Horizon, Two Journeys in Tibet.
  Longitude.
An Interview with Michael Meyer
Michael Meyer, recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship and a Lowell Thomas Award for travel writing, discusses his latest book In Manchuria. Working in the groove of many great travel writers, Meyer blends narrative nonfiction, memoir and reportage for an honest look at rural Northeast China (Dongbei, formerly known as Manchuria). Traveling by train and bus across the region in search of its history, which has been largely erased due to the Cultural Revolution, he gives voice to a phenomenon that is sweeping China as villages shift from commune to company town. Meyer has written previously on China in
In Manchuria
Chinese youth who live in the countryside often dream of moving to the city. Conversely, Michael Meyer lived in Beijing but dreamed of moving to Manchuria, the northeastern province of China known locally as Dongbei (rhymes with “wrong way”), where he eventually resided among his wife’s family in a village called Wasteland. With his new book In Manchuria, Meyer uses trains as a vehicular lens through which to see and explore the region’s history. When not teaching English in Wasteland (where students know him as “Professor Plumblossom”), he tours the countryside, searching for traces of history from before the 1950s. But in Manchuria, the past can be hard to come by.