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Blog posts tagged with 'france'

The Alps
ALP51In his entertaining new history, Stephen O'Shea drives 500 miles through the Alps, crossing six countries while musing on the historic personalities who braved the forbidding range, including Napoleon, Hitler and James Bond. His account, The Alps, begins with the idea of the sublime and the Romantics who championed it--artists and writers whose works evoked the beauty and terror of the Alps. O’Shea himself admits to a fear of heights and carefully chronicles each hairpin turn as he snakes his way from Geneva to Trieste through dizzying high passes in his shiny muscle car.
La Turbie, France
ALP52Kindly contributed by Jonathan Arlan, author of the new book Mountain Lines, in which he narrates an inspirational trek through the French Alps that he undertook in 2015. Arlan overcomes apprehension, nerves, poor physical condition and days of bad weather as he slowly conquers the Grand Traverse route from Lake Geneva to the Mediterranean. Along the way, the author meets friendly, decent people and experiences both true exhaustion and true exhilaration.
Top Ten Fall Travel Titles
BCY45Autumn is the season for armchair travelers. As the weather cools, the imagination sharpens, ready to transport us to distant lands. We've selected ten travel titles that we're looking forward to curling up with this fall as we dream up new destinations.   Epic Bike Rides of the World. The discerning editors at Lonely Planet organize 200 top places to pedal in this beautifully illustrated coffee table book. From family friendly rides in Buenos Aires to downhill trails near the Arctic Circle, to France, Spain, Mongolia, Italy and beyond, it's sure to contain a spark the interest of any cycling enthusiast.
Summer Reading
EAF448As the weather warms that list of summer reading keeps piling up, a tantalizing tower of intriguing stories, ready to transport you to new lands. Here are some paperbacks we recommend packing for your next trip to the beach! Circling the Sun. In this work of historical fiction, Paula McLain, bestselling author of The Paris Wife (FRN981), reimagines 1920s Kenya and the extraordinary life of record-setting aviatrix Beryl Markham.
The Only Street in Paris
Former New York Times Paris Bureau Chief Elaine Sciolino has lived in Paris since 2002, but it took her almost a decade to move to the rue des Martyrs, which she calls “the last real street in Paris, a half-mile celebration of the city in all its diversity.” Sciolino discovered the street early on as an appealing alternative to the touristy Marais. Visiting the neighborhood, located half a mile south of the Sacre-Coeur in the Ninth and Eighteenth Arrondissements, became an anticipated Sunday morning ritual. When it was time for the journalist to give in and make Paris her permanent home, she knew she could live nowhere else. In 2010 Sciolino moved into an apartment just off the rue des Martyrs.
An Interview with David Downie
In his new book A Passion for Paris David Downie embarks on an irreverent secular pilgrimage to the most romantic sites in Paris, weaving his own observations of the city's most alluring parks, atmospheric cafes and inspiring vistas with those of literary lights Victor Hugo, Georges Sand, Charles Baudelaire and other great Romantics. In this interview he answers our questions about Paris, revealing some unexpectedly romantic spots, from aisle seats to cemeteries.
  Longitude. How did your own love affair with Paris begin? Downie. In the fall of 1976, on a dark and stormy night... the affair was not love at first sight for either of us. I was 18 and bent by the weight of the world.
A Passion for Paris
In his new book A Passion for Paris David Downie explores why and how the City of Light is also the city of love. Weaving his own observations of Paris’ most alluring parks, atmospheric cafes and inspiring vistas with those of literary lights Victor Hugo, Georges Sand, Charles Baudelaire and other great Romantics, Downie embarks on an irreverent secular pilgrimage to the most romantic sites in Paris.
And the Winner is...
It's that time of year again, when the international literary community bestows honors upon its favored authors. This year’s Nobel Prize for Literature went to the French writer Patrick Modiano, "for the art of memory with which he has evoked the most ungraspable human destinies and uncovered the life-world of the occupation.” Suspended Sentences, Three Novellas. Although originally published separately, Patrick Modiano's three novellas (Afterimage, Suspended Sentences and Flowers of Ruin) form a single, compelling whole.
Unexpected Paris
Kindly contributed by historian Joan DeJean, author of How Paris Became Paris, The Invention of the Modern City. Beginning with 17th-century Bourbon monarchs like Henry IV, DeJean relates the fascinating story of how Parisian rulers transformed the city into a cosmopolitan metropolis.
D-Day: The 70th Anniversary
Each year, travelers from around the world make the pilgrimage to those beaches of Normandy with code names Utah, Omaha, Gold, Juno and Sword to commemorate the Allied invasion of France that initiated the liberation of continental Europe. For the 70th anniversary of D-Day, we're highlighting books to inform and immerse the traveler in the events surrounding that momentous day.