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Blog posts tagged with 'japan'

Obama Visits Hiroshima
JPN466On May 27 President Obama will become the first sitting U.S. president to visit Hiroshima, Japan since the U.S. first dropped an atomic bomb on the site at the end of World War II. In acknowledgement of the heavily symbolic act, we're recommending books to read about Hiroshima, including Odyssey's new guidebook, Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Hiroshima and Nagasaki, An Illustrated History, Anthology and Guide.
Best Travel Books of 2015
Looking for some book recommendations for 2016? As you begin planning you travels for the New Year, don't miss the top ten travel books of 2015. Where the Dead Pause, and the Japanese Say Goodbye. When her American father passes away, Marie Mutsuki Mockett seeks consolation in her mother's home country of Japan. Her relatives own a Buddhist temple near the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, and after the 2011 tsunami, radiation levels prohibit the burial of her grandfather.
The Inland Sea
“It is to the Inland Sea that I am bound,” travel writer Donald Richie announces at the opening of his 1971 classic, The Inland Sea, recently republished by Stonebridge Press in a new edition. Richie, bemoaning the industrialization and commercialism threatening Japanese society, flees to the islands scattered across the Inland Sea, a body of water almost completely bound by three of Japan’s four major islands. In the relative isolation of fishing villages he searches out the essence of traditional Japanese culture.
An Interview with Marie Mockett
Author Marie Mutsuki Mockett discusses her frequent travels to Japan in the wake of the 2011 tsunami, captured in her new travel memoir Where the Dead Pause, and the Japanese Say Goodbye. Her book is an unpretentious and engaging introduction to Japanese culture and Zen Buddhism as well as an exploration of how a particular culture accepts loss and alleviates suffering.
  Longitude. Rather than being the record of a straight chronological journey, your book gathers several different trips to Japan into one narrative. How would you describe the guiding force behind your journey as a whole? Mockett.
Where the Dead Pause, and the Japanese Say Goodbye
When her American father unexpectedly passes away, Marie Mutsuki Mockett seeks consolation in her mother’s home country of Japan. Her relatives own a Buddhist temple near the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, where, after the 2011 tsunami, radiation levels prohibit the burial of her grandfather, who has also recently passed. Burdened with these personal sorrows, Mockett travels in the wake of the storm to explore the grief of others as she seeks her own path toward healing. In her new book Where the Dead Pause, and the Japanese Say Goodbye, Mockett records her travels across the island nation. She treks around the base of Mt.
And the Winner is...
It's that time of year again, when the international literary community bestows honors upon its favored authors. This year’s Nobel Prize for Literature went to the French writer Patrick Modiano, "for the art of memory with which he has evoked the most ungraspable human destinies and uncovered the life-world of the occupation.” Suspended Sentences, Three Novellas. Although originally published separately, Patrick Modiano's three novellas (Afterimage, Suspended Sentences and Flowers of Ruin) form a single, compelling whole.
Bending Adversity
Financial Times Asia editor David Pilling spent many years as a correspondent based in Tokyo, returning to Japan just after the country was devastated by the 2011 tsunami. In the wake of the storm, Pilling interviewed numerous Japanese, including novelist Haruki Murakami, former prime minister Junichiro Koizumi, industrialists and bankers, activists and artists, teenagers and octogenarians, in an attempt to de-mystify the often misunderstood island nation.