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Blog posts tagged with 'national parks'

Year's Best Reads
USA592It's the perfect time to reflect on the past year. When we look back over 2016, we see a path littered with memorable reads, many of which we’ve selected as our  top ten travel books of the year. We hope each featured title serves to inspire further adventures in the New Year. The Hour of Land. Award-winning author Terry Tempest Williams travels to 12 carefully chosen national parks including Yellowstone, Acadia and Big Bend in this insightful journey. Equal parts memoir, natural history and ecology manifesto, Williams' book honors the centennial of the National Park Service by exploring why the protected, wild lands matter to the soul of America.
An Interview with Terry Tempest Williams
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Equal parts memoir, natural history and ecology manifesto, Terry Tempest Williams' book The Hour of Land honors the centennial our national parks by exploring why the protected, wild lands matter to the soul of America. In this interview, the ever-gracious Williams describes her favorite national park and defines the elusive “hour of land” for the nation.
    Longitude. At the beginning of 
Hopewell Culture National Historical Park
USA591Kindly contributed by award-winning writer Heather Hansen. To celebrate the centennial of the National Park Service, Hansen relates its wonderful 100-year history in her new book Prophets and Moguls, Rangers and Rogues, Bison and Bears: 100 Years of National Park Service. She interviewed dozens of people and traveled to many of the country's great parks, telling how the US bureau has fought to protect the country's most scenic places and defined the American national identity.
  Hopewell Culture National Historical Park (NHP) is a place few people encounter by accident.
The Naturalist
There are myriad ways that a president can leave a legacy. Darrin Lunde’s new biography The Naturalist: Theodore Roosevelt and the Rise of American Natural History examines the life, legacy and political career of Theodore Roosevelt through the prism of his fascination with nature and valiant efforts to preserve wildlife for future generations. As Supervisory Museum Specialist at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History, Lunde is especially interested in Roosevelt’s study of the natural world, which began at a surprisingly young age.
Twin Lakes, Alaska
coverKindly contributed by author and photographer Carl Johnson. In his new book Where Water is Gold, Johnson brings to light the struggle between developers and ecologists in southwest Alaska's Bristol Bay. A key habitat for millions of seabirds, salmon, otters, seals, walruses and endangered whale species, Bristol Bay also contains fine particles of precious metals (gold, copper and molybdenum) that industrialists wish to extract.
  When hiking 2,500 feet up the side of a mountain, the view often consists of just the details in the tundra below, from the vibrant pink blooms of moss campion to the bristly, crunchy details of caribou lichen.
The Hour of Land
USA592America’s national parks—celebrating a centennial anniversary this August—draw over 300 million visitors a year. “What are we searching for,” Terry Tempest Williams wonders at the beginning of her new collection of essays The Hour of Land, “and what do we find?” Williams counts herself among those millions of travelers as she explores her relationship to twelve national parks and monuments across the United States, from Effigy Mounds in Iowa to Gates of the Arctic.
Seed of the Future
Happy Birthday, Yosemite! On June 30, 1864, in the midst of the Civil War, President Abraham Lincoln signed the Yosemite Grant Act to promote a peaceful respite for Americans. The act would protect and preserve the Yosemite Valley and the Mariposa Grove of Giant Sequoias over the next 150 years.