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Blog posts tagged with 'photography'

An Interview with Marius Jovaisa
CBA303Cuba is back on everyone’s map. But while the country has opened to more visitors, few have been privy to the insider’s glimpse Marius Jovaisa enjoyed when he finally obtained permission to photograph the country from above. Here he shares some of that insider knowledge as well as a few of the spectacular views he captured in flight over the island nation—many more of these stunning vistas are collected in his new book Unseen Cuba.
  Longitude. What first sparked your passion for Cuba? Jovaisa. I came to like aerial photography as a genre some 12 years ago.
Unseen Cuba
CBA303Because of its unique political history, Cuba’s airspace has been subject to uncommon restrictions. Fueled by a passion for the country’s unique beauty, Lithuanian photographer Marius Jovaisa persevered through years of bureaucratic obstacles to receive permission to photograph the island nation from above. The result of his persistence is Unseen Cuba: over 400 pages of never before photographed vistas, from the misty mountains of the Sierra Cristal range to the sandbars, reefs and turquoise waters of the north coast to Baracoa, Cuba’s oldest city, and beyond.
An Interview with Piers Pickard
500px Photo ID: 114364631 - portrait d'un touareg entrain de confectionner une pièce d'argenterie traditionnelTo celebrate the release of the new third edition of The Travel Book, Lonely Planet's Managing Director of Publishing Piers Pickard answered a few of our questions about the production of the book –- and on the state of travel in general.   Longitude. We were thrilled to see this updated third edition of The Travel Book. What new feature, destination or photograph are you most excited to reveal in this version? We're most excited by the fact that every single image in the book is new -- that's more than 800 photographs of 230 countries and regions.
Twin Lakes, Alaska
coverKindly contributed by author and photographer Carl Johnson. In his new book Where Water is Gold, Johnson brings to light the struggle between developers and ecologists in southwest Alaska's Bristol Bay. A key habitat for millions of seabirds, salmon, otters, seals, walruses and endangered whale species, Bristol Bay also contains fine particles of precious metals (gold, copper and molybdenum) that industrialists wish to extract.
  When hiking 2,500 feet up the side of a mountain, the view often consists of just the details in the tundra below, from the vibrant pink blooms of moss campion to the bristly, crunchy details of caribou lichen.
Cuba
CBA261Kindly contributed by award-winning photographer Lorne Resnick, who in his new book Cuba, This Moment, Exactly So  presents passionate and heartwarming moments from the "Pearl of the Antilles." His 250 black-and-white photographs are organized around 30 micro-stories and include a foreword by the great travel writer Pico Iyer.
  I first visited Cuba in the summer of '95. It was, as most summers are when I have been in Cuba, searingly, intensely, wonderfully hot. I planned to stay for two weeks and stayed for two months. I fell in love with the country.
Migrations: Wildlife in Motion
wildebeest and zebrasBehind every photograph in Art Wolfe's now-classic collection Migrations: Wildlife in Motion are the primordial stirrings that prompt animals to travel incredible distances. Revised, updated and back in print, the coffee table book portrays large animal populations in motion around the globe. Wolfe catches gaggles of geese, herds of cattle, parcels of penguins and flamboyances of flamingos in M.C. Escher-inspired patterns, the masterful photographs a reminder that cyclical migrations are some of the world's most awe-inspiring phenomena.
Trinidad, Cuba
Kindly contributed by Michal McClure, whose photography book Cuba Awakening focuses on the close relationship between Cuba and the Soviet Union. McClure includes over 50 photographs (Henri Cartier-Bresson, Burt Glinn, Perfecto Romero, Seymour Raskin and more) that compare life in Soviet Russia with life in Fidel Castro's Cuba.
  If you are visiting Cuba, I hope you see this city with its Spanish colonial architecture and people living in a time of many years ago. Cubans love colors and with Trinidad they have created one of the most colorful towns I have seen in the world.
Light and Dust
Behind every photograph in the luxurious photo collection Light and Dust, Images and Stories from the Wild of East Africa is the prodigious passion of Italian photographer Federico Veronesi. His love for the Masai Mara drove Veronesi to his vocations as a wildlife guide, environmental activist and photographer -- and also to long mornings hiding in the backseat of his car watching antelopes, exhausting days of searching and dark nights of camping, “feeling like the only human on earth.” His photography searches for the still moments of “now” that overshadow Veronesi’s deep concerns for the area’s conservation.
The Yucatan
Kindly contributed by writer and photographer MacDuff Everton, who spent more than four decades living among the Maya. In his book, The Modern Maya, Everton updates our perception of Maya culture by revealing how individuals and families live, work and preserve their rich culture today. Everton is a contributing editor at National Geographic Traveler and author of the book Patagonia: La Ultima Esperanza.
  The Maya and the conquering Spanish looked at the land and saw two completely different realities—the difference between Spain and Yucatán could hardly be greater.
Passage to Cuba
As relations between the United State and Cuba continue to soften, travelers are eager to glimpse the island nation for the first time -- and before the country changes too quickly. Cuba's isolation meant certain elements of its culture remained frozen in time, allowing the visitor to feel themselves transported back to a different era, in which the automobiles, music and dance of previous days are preserved.