RSS

Blog posts tagged with 'sri lanka'

Year's Best Reads
USA592It's the perfect time to reflect on the past year. When we look back over 2016, we see a path littered with memorable reads, many of which we’ve selected as our  top ten travel books of the year. We hope each featured title serves to inspire further adventures in the New Year. The Hour of Land. Award-winning author Terry Tempest Williams travels to 12 carefully chosen national parks including Yellowstone, Acadia and Big Bend in this insightful journey. Equal parts memoir, natural history and ecology manifesto, Williams' book honors the centennial of the National Park Service by exploring why the protected, wild lands matter to the soul of America.
An Interview with John Gimlette
Award-winning journalist John Gimlette’s exuberant travelogues have entertained and informed readers about far-flung places, from Suriname to Labrador. In his new book Elephant Complex, he turns his attention to Sri Lanka, discussing everything from its startling landscapes to traumatic recent history.
  Longitude. You’ve written about countries as diverse as Paraguay, Newfoundland and French Guiana, but your travels to Sri Lanka begin in your own backyard of Tooting, England, with the Tamil diaspora who are your neighbors.
Elephant Complex
The island nation of Sri Lanka is home to around 5,800 elephants. The lumbering creatures traverse the teardrop island on alimankadas, or elephant paths, their entire lives, circling back to the same well-trodden routes again and again. In his latest book Elephant Complex, journalist John Gimlette employs the metaphor to explore Sri Lankan history, which, he writes, “never feels quite circular. Rather, there are recurring series of points of arrival and departure …No one is quite back where they started, and yet the same story will begin again, perhaps somewhere else.
This Divided Island
In the aftermath of the three-decade long Sri Lankan Civil War, journalists, governments and everyday Sri Lankan citizens continue to piece together an identity for the divided island. The long years of conflict between the majority Sinhalese government and the militant Tamil Tigers seeking an independent state ended in 2009 with the government-led annihilation of the Tigers. Travelers to the country today may not always see the remnants of the war, but they would be remiss not to join the conversation about it. New Delhi-based journalist Samanth Subramanian’s new book This Divided Island is an invitation to take part.
Spring Travel Titles
Like many travelers, we’re already looking ahead to spring. Whether plotting your travels or simply hoping for a good armchair vacation, here are some titles to watch for as the weather warms. Why the Dutch are Different. Mingling history with travelogue, English expat Ben Coates speaks to why the Netherlands is such a fascinating country, significant beyond its size. His probing narrative explains the importance of the color orange, the ongoing battle to keep water out, the Dutch love affairs with milk and beer, their attitudes toward nature, their world-famous culture of tolerance and why there are many “nether lands.”
Sri Lanka
Kindly contributed by Romesh Gunesekera whose stories, set in his native Sri Lanka, are steeped in the spirit of place. In his early collection Monkfish Moon a diverse set of characters ask the question, "what's happened?" as Gunesekera forces them (and us) to deal with the reality of a nation embroiled in Tamil-Sinhala strife. His slim novel Reef tells the haunting story of modern Sri Lanka through the eyes of a servant and his oblivious master.
Sigiriya, Sri Lanka
Kindly contributed by Nayomi Munaweera, whose debut novel Island of a Thousand Mirrors alternates between the stories of two young women on either side of the Sri Lankan Civil War between the Tamil and Sinhala people, exploring human struggle through a re-imagining of Sri Lanka's 1983 revolution. When the brutal conflict erupts on the island paradise, the jasmine-scented air mixes with the smell of gasoline, wealthy families flee for California and youths stay and fight. Amidst all the turmoil and trouble, Munaweera delivers a passionate portrait of place. Winner of the Commonwealth Book Prize for Asia, Munaweera's work has been compared to that of her countryman