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Blog posts tagged with 'travel'

An Interview with Piers Pickard
500px Photo ID: 114364631 - portrait d'un touareg entrain de confectionner une pièce d'argenterie traditionnelTo celebrate the release of the new third edition of The Travel Book, Lonely Planet's Managing Director of Publishing Piers Pickard answered a few of our questions about the production of the book –- and on the state of travel in general.   Longitude. We were thrilled to see this updated third edition of The Travel Book. What new feature, destination or photograph are you most excited to reveal in this version? We're most excited by the fact that every single image in the book is new -- that's more than 800 photographs of 230 countries and regions.
The Travel Book
WLD193Lonely Planet’s The Travel Book was first published in 2004 to much acclaim and has since sold over one million copies, becoming an essential part of any traveler’s library. Just released in its third edition, this encyclopedia of fun facts, essential travel information, excellent recommendations and vivid color photographs is an armchair traveler’s best friend. Each country profiled, no matter how big or small, gets a double-page spread in this big, glossy celebration of travel. All the countries—from Afghanistan to Zimbabwe—are portrayed in a portfolio of color photographs, a map, brief overview and fascinating facts.
What to Read in Rio
SPT21Speculation, debate and excitement have built all summer leading up to the 2016 Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Read up on the history, current events and culture of the controversial host country with our selection of books on Brazil. We've thrown a guidebook and map in as well for those adventuresome sports fans who may be on their way to the grandstand. The Games: A Global History of the Olympics. In this history, acclaimed sports writer David Goldblatt explores the world's greatest sporting event.
Cuba
CBA261Kindly contributed by award-winning photographer Lorne Resnick, who in his new book Cuba, This Moment, Exactly So  presents passionate and heartwarming moments from the "Pearl of the Antilles." His 250 black-and-white photographs are organized around 30 micro-stories and include a foreword by the great travel writer Pico Iyer.
  I first visited Cuba in the summer of '95. It was, as most summers are when I have been in Cuba, searingly, intensely, wonderfully hot. I planned to stay for two weeks and stayed for two months. I fell in love with the country.
Obama Visits Hiroshima
JPN466On May 27 President Obama will become the first sitting U.S. president to visit Hiroshima, Japan since the U.S. first dropped an atomic bomb on the site at the end of World War II. In acknowledgement of the heavily symbolic act, we're recommending books to read about Hiroshima, including Odyssey's new guidebook, Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Hiroshima and Nagasaki, An Illustrated History, Anthology and Guide.
White Sands
GD“Where Do We Come From? What Are We? Where Are We Going?” The first essay in Geoff Dyer’s new book White Sands asks these questions through Gauguin’s painting of the same title, which shows several Tahitian women in various poses of recline. Dyer travels to Tahiti in pursuit of the artist and the answers to the questions he scrawled in paint in the corner of his masterpiece. Dyer doesn’t find answers in Tahiti, any more than he finds that painting in Boston’s Museum of Fine Arts (it's on loan at the time of his visit). Rather, the questions follow him into each essay collected in
An Interview with Olivia Laing
Olivia Laing’s books are not easily categorized. To the River is a survey not only of the Ouse River and the English countryside that spreads from its banks, but of the entire landscape of English literature, from Kenneth Grahame and Iris Murdoch to Virginia Woolf, whose complicated relationship to the river in which she drowned is delicately excavated and explored. In The Trip to Echo Spring she examines the link between creativity and alcohol through the work and lives of six American writers, traveling to the places that defined their lives. With 
The Geography of Madness
WLD299During high school, travel writer Frank Bures spent a year in Italy as an exchange student. When he returned, he writes in his new book The Geography of Madness, he was not the same person. But rather than accepting the simple adage that travel can be life-changing, Bures wants to know what happened. “How was that possible?” he asks. “How could moving from one place, from one language, from one culture to another…change who you are?” While the experience of culture shock and its aftermath is a familiar one, most travelers will not have encountered what Bures describes in subsequent travels that took him to Nigeria, Borneo, Singapore, China and elsewhere.
Yaxchilan
Kindly contributed by John Harrison, author of several travel books including his most recent historical travel narrative 1519, A Journey to the End of Time. Harrison spent four months on the trail of destruction left by Spanish conquistador Hernan Cortes, walking the Mexican coast, cross-country to Mexico City and to sites in Guatemala. As he explores the worlds of the Spanish and Aztecs, people groups that believed that the world was about to end, Harrison receives a diagnosis of cancer. He must face his own mortality even as he probes the larger questions of human history.
Films from National Geographic
NAT175You know we recommend what books to read before you travel, but we can also tell you what movies to watch! Browse our wide selection of place-based films, including these fascinating documentaries from National Geographic. Some favorites are featured below, but you can see an even wider selection here. Happy viewing! Darwin's Secret Notebooks.