RSS

Blog posts tagged with 'what's new'

An Interview with Michael Engelhard
ARC360Kindly contributed by Michael Engelhard, this interview is used with permission from Canadian Geographic. The product of meticulous research, Engelhard’s latest book Ice Bear examines over 8,000 years of polar bear history. Whether spirit guide, enemy or symbol of ecological crisis, he argues, the ice bear has always loomed large in the human imagination.
  What made you want to write this book? At the risk of anthropomorphizing—a human tendency I address in Ice Bear—I have long identified with bears. I’ve had a bearish streak since childhood, bearish moods and manners combined with a blockhead that only worsens as I age.
An Interview with Piers Pickard
500px Photo ID: 114364631 - portrait d'un touareg entrain de confectionner une pièce d'argenterie traditionnelTo celebrate the release of the new third edition of The Travel Book, Lonely Planet's Managing Director of Publishing Piers Pickard answered a few of our questions about the production of the book –- and on the state of travel in general.   Longitude. We were thrilled to see this updated third edition of The Travel Book. What new feature, destination or photograph are you most excited to reveal in this version? We're most excited by the fact that every single image in the book is new -- that's more than 800 photographs of 230 countries and regions.
An Interview with Caroline Eden
authorsWriter and photographer Caroline Eden provides an excellent introduction to Central Asian flavors in her new book Samarkand, co-authored with Eleanor Ford and with photography from Laura Edwards. The beautifully produced cookbook includes travel essays and photos alongside mouth-watering recipes that place Central Asia and the Caucasus back on the culinary map.
  Longitude. Uzbekistan may not be on every traveler’s bucket list. What first drew you to Samarkand? Eden. The wonderful Islamic architecture primarily, but also just the name…“Samarkand.
An Interview with Terry Tempest Williams
TTWauthorphoto
Equal parts memoir, natural history and ecology manifesto, Terry Tempest Williams' book The Hour of Land honors the centennial our national parks by exploring why the protected, wild lands matter to the soul of America. In this interview, the ever-gracious Williams describes her favorite national park and defines the elusive “hour of land” for the nation.
    Longitude. At the beginning of 
The National Parks Centennial
USA584August marks the centennial celebration of America’s national parks. “What is the relevance of our national parks in the twenty-first century?” award-winning author Terry Tempest Williams wonders in her insightful new collection of essays,
What to Read in Rio
SPT21Speculation, debate and excitement have built all summer leading up to the 2016 Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Read up on the history, current events and culture of the controversial host country with our selection of books on Brazil. We've thrown a guidebook and map in as well for those adventuresome sports fans who may be on their way to the grandstand. The Games: A Global History of the Olympics. In this history, acclaimed sports writer David Goldblatt explores the world's greatest sporting event.
An Interview with Frank Bures
BuresIn his new book The Geography of Madness travel writer Frank Bures explores “how our ideas can kill us, how our beliefs can save us and how these things quietly determine the course of our lives.” His quest to understand culture-bound syndromes led him to Nigeria, Borneo, Singapore, China and beyond. In these places Bures pursues “fox ghosts and lizards that crawl under your skin, poison pork and poisoned minds.” He becomes fascinated with the world’s strangest syndromes, exploring how one culture could believe something that would appear entirely out of the realm of possibility to another.
An Interview with Ben Coates
BCoatesIn his new book Why the Dutch Are Different, English expat Ben Coates speaks to why the Netherlands is such a fascinating country, significant beyond its size. His probing narrative explains the importance of the color orange, the ongoing battle to keep water out, the Dutch love affairs with milk and beer, their attitudes toward nature and their world-famous culture of tolerance. We loved the book so much we just had to ask him more about just what makes the Dutch so different.
  Longitude.  As your title itself states, Dutch culture can be quite different from the rest of Europe.
Obama Visits Hiroshima
JPN466On May 27 President Obama will become the first sitting U.S. president to visit Hiroshima, Japan since the U.S. first dropped an atomic bomb on the site at the end of World War II. In acknowledgement of the heavily symbolic act, we're recommending books to read about Hiroshima, including Odyssey's new guidebook, Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Hiroshima and Nagasaki, An Illustrated History, Anthology and Guide.
An Interview with Olivia Laing
Olivia Laing’s books are not easily categorized. To the River is a survey not only of the Ouse River and the English countryside that spreads from its banks, but of the entire landscape of English literature, from Kenneth Grahame and Iris Murdoch to Virginia Woolf, whose complicated relationship to the river in which she drowned is delicately excavated and explored. In The Trip to Echo Spring she examines the link between creativity and alcohol through the work and lives of six American writers, traveling to the places that defined their lives. With