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Blog posts tagged with 'what's new'

A Walk in the Woods
Fans of Bill Bryson’s book A Walk in the Woods, in which the satirical travel writer tackles (or tries to, anyway) the whole of the Appalachian Trail, won’t want to miss the new film adaptation, starring Nick Nolte, Emma Thompson and, of course, Robert Redford as Bryson, in theaters September 2. Also recently released: 13 folded
An Interview with Paula McLain
Best-selling author Paula McLain agreed to answer our questions about 1920s Kenya, the extraordinary life of record-setting aviatrix Beryl Markham and what it means to write historical fiction. In her new book Circling the Sun, McLain re-imagines 1920s Kenya and the extraordinary life of record-setting aviator Beryl Markham. Abandoned by her mother and raised on a failing farm among the native Kipsigis tribe, Markham eventually enters the bohemian Happy Valley set and becomes entangled in a love triangle with safari hunter Denys Finch Hatton and author Karen Blixen. Markham's passion and fate, however, would converge in the golden-age world of aviation.
  Longitude.
Stanford Dolman Award Shortlist
It's that time of year again, when an esteemed group of travel writers -- this year Jeremy Seal, Sara Wheeler, Robert Macfarlane, Katie Hickman, Jason Goodwin and Oliver Bullough, headed up by chairman Barnaby Rogerson (proprietor of Eland Books) -- gather to judge the year's best travel writing. On September 28 the newly named Stanford Dolman Travel Book Award of 5,000 pounds will be awarded to one of the following titles selected for the 2015 shortlist. You can view previous winners of the Dolman Travel Book Award here.
An Interview with David Downie
In his new book A Passion for Paris David Downie embarks on an irreverent secular pilgrimage to the most romantic sites in Paris, weaving his own observations of the city's most alluring parks, atmospheric cafes and inspiring vistas with those of literary lights Victor Hugo, Georges Sand, Charles Baudelaire and other great Romantics. In this interview he answers our questions about Paris, revealing some unexpectedly romantic spots, from aisle seats to cemeteries.
  Longitude. How did your own love affair with Paris begin? Downie. In the fall of 1976, on a dark and stormy night... the affair was not love at first sight for either of us. I was 18 and bent by the weight of the world.
Matterhorn Summit
July 14 is usually a day for the French, but this year the Swiss will join in with celebrations of their own. On that day 150 years ago, British climber Edward Whymper and his expedition team were the first to reach the peak of the Matterhorn at 4,478 meters. Throughout this anniversary year the remarkable feat will be celebrated with a variety of mountaineering experiences, classic alpine traditions and plenty of festivity in Zermatt and surrounding villages. Read more here to plan your trip, then pick up some of these fascinating books on the subject. Killing Dragons, The Conquest of the Alps.
An Interview with Stephan Van Dam
Map maker, designer and entrepreneur Stephan Van Dam shares the vision and inspiration behind his unique maps, from sexy packaging to the “art of ellipses.”
  Longitude. How and when did VanDam Maps begin? Van Dam. While studying environmental design at Parsons I invented an origami design which refolded automatically. It craved cartographic uses. So I sought out a group of European cartographers to show me the ropes and became a map maker. I also patented the fold and built a machine to fold the maps. When American Express agreed to offer The World Unfolds to card members I was in business and a publisher.

Interview with Carol Devine & Wendy Trusler
Of interest to armchair travelers, environmentalists, adventurers and foodies alike, The Antarctic Book of Cooking and Cleaning is an absorbing chronicle of a 55-person environmental cleanup expedition in Bellingshausen, Antarctica. The two authors, Carol Devine, who organized the trip, and expedition chef Wendy Trusler, share the rich experiences and creative thought that went into their captivating travelogue.
Longitude. What first inspired you to take a group of volunteers to clean up a portion of the Antarctic? Did you find the prospect intimidating at the time?
In Memoriam: James Salter
“Travel writing is something you do for the money, not a lot of money, but the working conditions can be pleasant,” reads the verbose subtitle of James Salter’s There and Then, a collection of sketches and essays that cover 20 years of the novelist's peripatetic life, particularly his extended time hiking and skiing in the Alps of Switzerland, Austria and France. Whatever his motivations, Salter’s travel writing, which stretched across genres, reveals a man with a passion for place and an acute sensitivity to the details that transport a reader there.
Summer Reads
We spent the last week in May at Book Expo America in New York City, scouring publisher booths for the best travel titles coming out this fall. But let's not get too far ahead of ourselves, with a summer of beach reading spreading before us. To tide you over, stock up on some of the popular paperbacks we've hand-selected for your summer reading pleasure. Midnight in Europe. On the eve of World War II, Cristian Ferrar, a Spanish expat, decides to help supply weapons to the beleaguered army fighting Franco in Spain.
An Interview with David Gessner
In his latest book, All the Wild That Remains, David Gessner follows in the footsteps of two great environmentalists, Edward Abbey and Wallace Stegner, from Stegner's birthplace in Saskatchewan to the site of Abbey's pilgrimages to Arches. His homage to the West and to the two writers who celebrated and defended it inspires and entertains while asking important questions about our role in cultivating a meaningful relationship with the wild. Gessner agreed to discuss some of our own questions about the intersection of ecology and travel, of wandering and the wild.