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Blog posts tagged with 'wildlife'

The Places Where Life Begins
ARC360
Kindly contributed by Michael Engelhard, author of the forthcoming Ice Bear, The Cultural History of an Icon. The product of meticulous research, his cultural narrative examines over 8,000 years of polar bear history. Engelhard probes the narratives of the Inuit, hunters and settlers as well as modern science to show the many forms the powerful, elusive animal has taken. In his book American Wild Engelhard documents his travels between the two areas of the world he identifies as his "soul-scapes," canyon country of the American Southwest and Alaska's great wilds.
The Galapagos Islands
Kindly contributed by Marylee Stephenson, whose guidebook The Galapagos Islands and Ecuador is out in a fully revised third edition that includes a new chapter on Ecuador. Subtitled "Your Essential Handbook for Exploring Darwin's Enchanted Islands," her practical guide to the archipelago features 100 color photos and coverage of popular visitor sites.
  I’ve been visiting the Galapagos since 1981—with my tenth and latest trip just over a year ago. So much has changed—much for the good, but challenges remain.
Wildlife of the World
Penguins pant to keep cool. The western tarsier has the largest eyes of any mammal, relative to its size; each eyeball is slightly heavier than the nocturnal primate’s brain. An orangutan’s arm span can reach seven feet. African savannah elephants are known to care for wounded relatives. From bird-eating spiders to polar bears to honeybees, DK’s Wildlife of the World introduces some of the most spectacular wildlife on the planet. This virtual safari brings readers face-to-face with the world’s most interesting animals who live in habitats as diverse as the Amazon, the Himalayas, the Sahara and the South Pole. The unique traits of more than 400 species are celebrated with an in-depth profile paired with stunning photographs.
Light and Dust
Behind every photograph in the luxurious photo collection Light and Dust, Images and Stories from the Wild of East Africa is the prodigious passion of Italian photographer Federico Veronesi. His love for the Masai Mara drove Veronesi to his vocations as a wildlife guide, environmental activist and photographer -- and also to long mornings hiding in the backseat of his car watching antelopes, exhausting days of searching and dark nights of camping, “feeling like the only human on earth.” His photography searches for the still moments of “now” that overshadow Veronesi’s deep concerns for the area’s conservation.
The Earth Is My Witness
“The Earth is my witness,” Siddhartha said, and with that acceptance of the Earth and acknowledgement of what is owed to it, he became the Buddha. The phrase is a fitting title for Art Wolfe’s latest book, The Earth Is My Witness, an artful celebration of the planet's fast-disappearing landscapes, wildlife and cultures as captured by the lens of the veteran photographer. Having studied both art and anthropology, Wolfe’s work displays a diversity of animal life, natural landscapes untouched by modernity and intimate portraits of indigenous peoples.