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The Longitude Blog

The Durrells of Corfu
GRE35For those of you watching season one of The Durrells in Corfu, which airs this month on PBS Masterpiece, we’re featuring the wonderful books by Gerald Durrell that the series is based on. In a six-part adaptation of the playful memoirs (great for family read-alouds), Keeley Hawes (Upstairs Downstairs) stars as a widow who relocates to the island of Corfu with her four children, including eleven-year-old Gerry (played by Milo Parks), whose explorations on the island as a child inspired him to become a naturalist. My Family and Other Animals.
The Southern Ocean
JeanauthorKindly contributed by Jean McNeil, author of Ice Diaries: an Antarctic Memoir, published by ECW Press. Ice Diaries is the winner of the Adventure Travel category as well as the Grand Prize at the 2016 Banff Mountain Film Festival and Book Competition.
  I have written substantial parts of my last two books at sea, much of them while clinging to the desk with one hand while looking out the cabin window to determine which stage we were in the great oceanic washing machine cycle. If the porthole was submerged, it was bad. If I suddenly found myself horizontal when I thought I had been standing, or vice versa, then it was bad.
Body of Water
CRB355In his new book Body of Water, poet and Montana fly-fishing guide Chris Dombrowski maps the Bahamas—its ecology, human history and relationship to the tourism industry—through the person of David Pinder, a legendary bonefishing guide. Dombrowski is deep in a personal depression when a friend offers him a trip to the Bahamas to fish for the elusive and highly-prized bonefish at a prestigious resort. There Dombrowski meets a mentor and guide in the now-retired Pinder, a Bahamian whose stories of his guiding days and the fish he caught, or guided others to catch, are epic narratives told with an often poetic flare.
An Interview with Michael Engelhard
ARC360Kindly contributed by Michael Engelhard, this interview is used with permission from Canadian Geographic. The product of meticulous research, Engelhard’s latest book Ice Bear examines over 8,000 years of polar bear history. Whether spirit guide, enemy or symbol of ecological crisis, he argues, the ice bear has always loomed large in the human imagination.
  What made you want to write this book? At the risk of anthropomorphizing—a human tendency I address in Ice Bear—I have long identified with bears. I’ve had a bearish streak since childhood, bearish moods and manners combined with a blockhead that only worsens as I age.
My Beer Year
coverIf you’ve been paying attention, you may have noticed that beer, especially craft beer, is in right now. According to the Washington Post, the number of breweries in the United States has increased twofold in just four years. As of December 2015, there are 4,144 breweries in the country. Lucy Burningham, beer aficionada and author of the recently released My Beer Year, has been rejoicing in this beer renaissance. Burningham decided to take passion for beer to the next level by becoming a certified beer expert, studying independently and traveling throughout the United States and abroad to Europe in her efforts to master the craft.
Chimney Rock
chimney3Kindly contributed by historian David Welky, whose new book A Wretched and Precarious Situation we are thrilled to recommend to travelers to the Arctic. Delving into newly discovered letters, diary entries and field notes, Welky uncovers how the Crocker Land Expedition (1913 to 1917) survived shipwreck, disease, low supplies and murder while trying to explore (what they thought was) a new continent. Here he shares how his work as a historian colors his experience of each destination he visits.   As a professional historian, I feel the past wherever I go. Walking into a bungalow home sends me into the Roaring Twenties.
An Interview with Piers Pickard
500px Photo ID: 114364631 - portrait d'un touareg entrain de confectionner une pièce d'argenterie traditionnelTo celebrate the release of the new third edition of The Travel Book, Lonely Planet's Managing Director of Publishing Piers Pickard answered a few of our questions about the production of the book –- and on the state of travel in general.   Longitude. We were thrilled to see this updated third edition of The Travel Book. What new feature, destination or photograph are you most excited to reveal in this version? We're most excited by the fact that every single image in the book is new -- that's more than 800 photographs of 230 countries and regions.
The Travel Book
WLD193Lonely Planet’s The Travel Book was first published in 2004 to much acclaim and has since sold over one million copies, becoming an essential part of any traveler’s library. Just released in its third edition, this encyclopedia of fun facts, essential travel information, excellent recommendations and vivid color photographs is an armchair traveler’s best friend. Each country profiled, no matter how big or small, gets a double-page spread in this big, glossy celebration of travel. All the countries—from Afghanistan to Zimbabwe—are portrayed in a portfolio of color photographs, a map, brief overview and fascinating facts.
A Visit to Don Otavio
MEX126A Visit to Don Otavio, which the esteemed travel writer Bruce Chatwin called “the most perfect travel book of the 20th century,” is back in print in a new edition from New York Review of Books (Chatwin, in fact, delivers the introduction). Originally published in 1953, Sybille Bedford’s account of her travels through Mexico just after World War II is full of astute detail and novelistic flourishes—the author herself described it as “a travel book written by a novelist.” Her vivid scenes, larger-than-life characters and charming descriptions of her adventures with her traveling companion, “E.
An Interview with Caroline Eden
authorsWriter and photographer Caroline Eden provides an excellent introduction to Central Asian flavors in her new book Samarkand, co-authored with Eleanor Ford and with photography from Laura Edwards. The beautifully produced cookbook includes travel essays and photos alongside mouth-watering recipes that place Central Asia and the Caucasus back on the culinary map.
  Longitude. Uzbekistan may not be on every traveler’s bucket list. What first drew you to Samarkand? Eden. The wonderful Islamic architecture primarily, but also just the name…“Samarkand.