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Scandinavia

Scandinavia

Stalwart representatives of northern Europe, the countries of Norway, Sweden and Finland loom large in the tales of Viking crusaders. The three Nordic nations, along with starkly beautiful Iceland, call to explorers seeking dramatic mountains and stunning fjords, while food lovers find much to offer in the region's savory cuisine. Recent scholarship looks into what makes the Scandinavian model so successful while Michael Booth turns a critical eye on the myth of Nordic bliss in The Almost Nearly Perfect People.

Follow the links below to see recommended reading for each destination.

The Longitude Blog – Scandinavia
The Nordic Theory of Everything
nordic theory coverThe American fascination with all things Scandinavian, from hygge to the minimalist architecture and design, has been growing over the past few years and launched a number of articles and books obsessed with what makes Denmark and its northern neighbors among the happiest and highest performing cultures in the world, such as Michael Booth’s The Almost Nearly Perfect People. New York Times and Atlantic Journalist Anu Partanen adds to the conversation with her recent release The Nordic Theory of Everything.
The Woman in Cabin 10
woman in cabin ten coverA luxury cruise with a small number of guests takes off in search of the Aurora Borealis by way of the North Sea. All goes well until a woman vanishes, pushed off a balcony into the freezing waters below, with only one witness: travel journalist Lo Blacklock, who scrambles to piece together the clues and uncover the truth. Sound like an Agatha Christie tale? Not quite, but The Woman in Cabin 10, by English novelist Ruth Ware, has earned favorable—and apt—comparisons to the works of the reigning queen of the mystery genre.
In Memoriam: Henning Mankell
Fans of Scandinavian noir are mourning the death of Henning Mankell, the author The New York Times has crowned “the dean” of the increasingly popular genre. Mankell penned the well-loved Kurt Wallander series, starring the eponymous detective and his uncanny ability to solve crimes, most of them brutal, and many occurring in and around the real-life town of Ystad, located on the Baltic Sea south of Stockholm. The town has become a literary pilgrimage site for many noir readers.